Top Menu Left

Top Menu Right

Gates Foundation: Three Obvious Solutions Ignored

600px-BillMelindaGatesFoundationI saw Melinda Gates on TV the other day, saying the Gates Foundation (to which Warren Buffet gives billions) is focused on “solving” three big problems in the world: malaria, polio, and government schools in America.

But these problems have already been solved, have they not? What is the mystery? Malaria? Established solution: DDT; Polio? Established solution: Jonas Salk’s vaccine; Government schools? Established solution: Private , profit-making schools (i.e., capitalism).

Why are these known solutions not adopted worldwide? Because socialists and environmentalists oppose them. Yet while the Gates Foundation seeks “solutions,” it supports these opponents of the existing solutions.

Related:

Image: Wikipedia Commons

,

Richard M. Salsman

Richard M. Salsman is president of InterMarket Forecasting, Inc., an economic-investment consulting firm that he founded in 2000. Previously he was an economist at Wainwright Economics, Inc. and a banker at the Bank of New York and Citibank. Dr. Salsman has authored the books Gold and Liberty (1995) and Breaking the Banks: Central Banking Problems and Free Banking Solutions (1990), six chapters in edited volumes, and scores of articles. His worked has appeared in the Georgetown Journal of Law and Public Policy, the Wall Street Journal, the New York Times, Forbes, the Economist, the Financial Post, the Intellectual Activist, and The Objective Standard (where he is also a Contributing Editor). Since 2010 he has been a regular essayist at Forbes.com. Dr. Salsman earned a B.A. in economics from Bowdoin College (1981), an M.A. in economics from New York University (1988), and a PhD in political economy from Duke University (2012). His dissertation, “The Political Economy of Public Credit,” explores the theory, history, and consequences of government borrowing.


Comments submitted to TOS Blog are moderated. To be considered for posting, a comment must be civil, substantive, and fewer than 400 words in length. If approved, your comment will be posted soon.