Top Menu Left

Top Menu Right

Subscriber-only Content

This audio content is accessible only to current Audio or Premium subscribers. For access, login, subscribe or upgrade your subscription.

Get Access...

Subscriber-only Content

This ebook content is accessible only to current Ebook or Premium subscribers. For access, login, subscribe or upgrade your subscription.

Get Access...

Laws Against Human Life and the Heroes Who Fight Them

It’s almost as though some politicians want to kill people. Certainly the political assault on medical freedom threatens people’s lives. Consider a couple recent news stories.

John Graham writes for Forbes about ObamaCare’s “2.3 percent excise tax on medical devices,” a tax he describes as “a savage blow to innovation.” Graham summarizes research finding the tax will cost many thousands of jobs, reduce “research and development by about $2 billion every year,” and result in “about one million life-years lost annually.” Thankfully, as Graham notes, various federal politicians are trying to repeal the tax before it take effect January 1—but why did Congress pass this killer tax in the first place?

Next, writing for Freedom and Individual Rights in Medicine, Paul Hsieh Describes Virginia’s “Certificates of Need” (CON) which force doctors to prove to bureaucrats that they “need” life-saving medical devices such as MRI machines before they can buy them. Hsieh, himself a radiologist, writes, “I’ve practiced medicine in states without and with such Certificate of Need requirements. These CONs jack up prices and reduce access for patients, to benefit those providers with enough political ‘pull’ to restrict competition.” Thankfully, the Institute for Justice (IJ) has initiated a challenge to Virginia’s CON program in federal court.

That such laws exist is an atrocity. But at least journalists such as Graham, doctors such as Hsieh, and lawyers such as those at IJ speak out and challenge such laws. Here’s to these heroes championing life and liberty.

Like this post? Join our mailing list to receive our weekly digest. And for in-depth commentary from an Objectivist perspective, subscribe to our quarterly journal, The Objective Standard.


Image of IJ Client Dr. Mark Monteferrante: Institute for Justice

, ,

Comments submitted to TOS Blog are moderated and checked periodically. To be considered for posting, a comment must be civil, substantive, on topic, and no longer than 400 words. Ad hominem attacks, arguments from intimidation, misrepresentations, off-topic comments, and comments that ignore points made in the article will be deleted. Thank you for helping us to keep the discussion intellectually profitable.