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British Scientists Achieve Breakthrough in Alzheimer’s Research

My grandfather played a huge role in my life as a young child, and we remained close into my adulthood. Thus, watching him suffer with Alzheimer’s—slowly losing his memory, his ability to recognize his loved ones, and his ability to live independently—was agonizing. And, of course, I live with the prospect that I may share a similar fate. For these personal reasons, news reports about potential Alzheimer’s treatments tend to jump out at me.

Thankfully, as Fox News reports, British scientists have made headway toward treating Alzheimer’s and other diseases involving abnormal proteins. The scientists “induced a neurodegenerative disease” in lab mice, then treated some of them with a substance intended to stop the disease, and it worked: “The mice who were treated remained free of symptoms like memory loss, impaired reflexes, and limb dragging five weeks later.” For details, see the article here.

Godspeed to these men of the mind who are working to extend and improve our lives—heroes all.

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