Summer 2015 • Vol. 10, No. 2

Summer 2015 Cover

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From the Editor, Summer 2015

Welcome to the Summer 2015 issue of The Objective Standard. In the wake of yet another effort on the part of jihadists to silence critics of Islam, cartoonist and blogger Bosch Fawstin made time to chat with me about the jihadists’ attempt to murder him and the other participants at the pro-free-speech event in Garland, Texas, earlier this month. Fawstin discusses his experience at that event, his work in general, and what drives him to do what he does. The interview is accompanied by three of Fawstin’s drawings, including his prize-winning cartoon of Muhammad. Other features in this issue include my essay on the basic schools of thought regarding the proper purpose of U.S. foreign policy, which examines the aims of and arguments for so-called “idealism” and “realism” and presents the case for an alternative school that may be called “egoism.” Next up is James S. Valliant’s article “The New Testament Versus the American Revolution,” which shows that (conservatives’ claims to the contrary notwithstanding) the impetus for and actions comprising the American Revolution directly contradict the tenets of Christian scripture. In “Lessons of the Armenian Genocide,” Andrew Bernstein examines the history of and motive behind this underreported atrocity,. . . Continue »

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Book and Film Reviews


Whiplash and the Quest for Greatness

Ari Armstrong February 28, 2015 Audio

At its heart, Whiplash is the story of a young man who strives for greatness in his chosen career and who struggles to overcome the failings of his overbearing mentor to do so. The film is inspiring, not only because it portrays the quest for greatness, but because the people who created the film achieved greatness in their work.



Grand Budapest Hotel Worth a Visit

Ari Armstrong March 19, 2015 Audio

Don’t be fooled by the pastel exterior of The Grand Budapest Hotel. Although laced with comedic elements, this is a serious film with important things to say about suffering and hope, betrayal and courage, brutality and love. It is strange but worth a visit.