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Former Buckyballs CEO Zucker Files Suit against Abusive Agency

After the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) drove the company that produced Buckyballs (small magnets sold to adults as toys) out of business, the agency sought to hold Craig Zucker—former CEO of the company—personally liable for the cost of the recall.

Zucker fought back with his United We Ball PR and fundraising campaign, and now Zucker is pursuing legal action against CPSC through Cause of Action. That organization’s executive director, Dan Epstein, explains:

The Commission has committed an unprecedented act by attempting to hold an individual entrepreneur liable for a recall that CPSC is seeking against a company that it forced out of business. At a minimum this action is an obvious overreach of the CPSC’s authority and at maximum it is an illegal abuse of power by persons within the Commission who seek to punish Mr. Zucker. Entrepreneurs in this country should not have to face a rogue federal agency that is merely making up the rules as they go along. The CPSC’s actions against Mr. Zucker are a very real threat to the liberty of every small business owner nationwide.

Kudos to Zucker and Cause of Action for fighting back against the rights-violating CPSC. May the courts reign in CPSC’s abuses and score at least a partial victory for the rights of entrepreneurs to produce and sell goods and services.

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Image: Craig Zucker

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