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From the Editor

From The Objective Standard, Vol. 5, No. 2.

Welcome to the Summer 2010 issue of TOS, with which we are launching three new subscription formats: audio, e-book, and premium.

The audio subscription (which includes access to the website or HTML edition of the journal) provides MP3 versions of TOS articles and reviews that can be downloaded to and played on your computer and a variety of audio devices. (Audio articles are also available à la carte, and, beginning with the Spring 2010 issue, all new articles are and will be available in audio format.)

The e-book subscription includes access to both EPUB and PDF versions of the journal (as well as the website edition). The EPUB version offers “reflowable,” resizable text and works with a variety of devices including laptop and desktop computers, the Apple iPad, the Barnes & Noble Nook, and the Sony Reader. The PDF version is a non-reflowable digital replica of the print journal and may be viewed on a variety of devices as well.

The premium subscription includes access to each of our subscription products: print, audio, e-book, and website. Full descriptions and pricing for all these options can be found on the subscriptions page of our website.

As to the content of the issue at hand, my article “Israel and America’s Flotilla Follies (and How To Avoid Them in the Future)” considers the essentials of the recent “peace activist” effort to breach Israel’s blockade of Gaza, the pathetic nature of Israel and America’s responses to the assault, and the principles that should have governed their responses.

In “Why Anthony Daniels Smears Ayn Rand,” Alan Germani examines Daniels’s recent New Criterion article “Ayn Rand: Engineer of Souls” and ponders the question, “Why, to the detriment of his own credibility, would an otherwise capable intellectual so grossly misrepresent Rand’s actual views—and do so, not at a cocktail party, but in a public forum?”

In “How to Protect Yourself Against ObamaCare,” physician Paul Hsieh offers some practical advice toward preserving your access to quality health care in this new era of “change.”

In “The Montessori Method: Educating Children for a Lifetime of Learning and Happiness,” Heike Larson zeros in on the essentials of a Montessori education, showing “its deep respect for the child’s reasoning mind and his need to develop the habit of focusing and concentrating it for sustained periods of time.”

Sarah Biddle reviews the Korean television series Dae Jang Geum, whose “breathtaking cinematography, beautiful costumes, mouthwatering food, and rich soundtrack integrate with [a] profound story to create a superlative work of art.”

In my interview with philosopher of science David Harriman, he discusses his new book, The Logical Leap, in which he presents Leonard Peikoff’s theory of induction; the Falling Apple Science Institute; and the future of science and science education.

Finally, in “Objective Moral Virtues: Principled Actions” (chapter 6 of my book Loving Life: The Morality of Self-Interest and the Facts that Support It), I present and concretize the principles of action essential to a lifetime of happiness.

The books reviewed in this issue are: Freethinkers: A History of American Secularism, by Susan Jacoby (reviewed by Daniel Wahl); The Beginnings of Western Science: The European Scientific Tradition in Philosophical, Religious, and Institutional Context, Prehistory to A.D. 1450, 2nd ed., by David C. Lindberg (reviewed by Frederick Seiler); The Greatest Trade Ever: The Behind-the-Scenes Story of How John Paulson Defied Wall Street and Made Financial History, by Gregory Zuckerman (reviewed by Daniel Wahl); and That First Season, by John Eisenberg (reviewed by Joseph Kellard).

Enjoy the issue, and have a wonderful summer!

—Craig Biddle

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